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Chronicles & Tales
Ellis J. Wells





Interviews - Sarah Whitehouse

Sarah Whitehouse
Role: Praxilla of Sicyon

What's the best Shakespeare production you've ever seen?

While I was at school, I saw a production of "Hamlet" at the Birmingham Rep. It was just really cleverly staged, with lights coming up through the floor instead of walls, so the ghost literally walked through the walls of the castle, which was really exciting. I was doing my A-levels and studying the play at the time, and I had no idea that that sort of surprise was coming. It made me realise how amazing and magical theatre could be, and set me on this road to a love of Shakespeare.

You're one of the only cast members who's done Shakespeare on film before. How does acting Shakespeare on stage differ to what we have to do on film?

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Heidi Mumford-Yeo - Cannes Film Festival 2019

Palais des Festivals, Cannes, France
Festival date: 14–25 May 2019
Heidi Mumford-Yeo
Role: Phrynia


Hello Heidi. Lovely to chat with you today.  Of course, you play Phrynia in Misanthropos, but today we are discussing your prolific attendance at the Cannes Film Festival in recent years. To start it off: when did you first attend Cannes and how many times have you been in total?

Hi Ellis, I first went to Cannes in 2015, so this will be my third year; very excited!


Cards on the table I've never been to Cannes, so it's all a mystery to me.  Can you describe it?  The atmosphere, the ceremony (by which I mean the 'pomp and spectacle' of the festival and how one behaves, etc.).

I mean, it’s as you would imagine I think, but actually being there, surrounded by so many incredible people, people you respect and look up to – that’s, for me, what makes it such a privilege to attend. My first time was a little nerve-wracking but I think that’s part of the experience. Quite surreal at times, when you find yourself next to Adrian Brody with the inner voice ‘act normal’ screaming at you!


You will also be going again this year, I believe, which I'm very jealous about by the way.  Can you tell us about the film you are there promoting?

Read more: Heidi Mumford-Yeo - Cannes Film Festival 2019

Interviews - Heidi Mumford-Yeo

Heidi Mumford-Yeo
Role: Phrynia

Hello Heidi. Thank you so much for talking to us today.  I'll kick off very simply, as this is  Shakespeare feature film, by asking what the best Shakespeare performance you've seen is?

Goodness, that’s a tough one. I think it would have to be Trevor Nunn’s "Macbeth" with Ian McKellen and Judi Dench for the RSC. I watched the recording as a drama student and revisited it over the years; I still consider it to be pretty much the apex of performance and direction - a masterclass in acting that I’m uncertain has been surpassed.

Did you have any experience with Timon of Athens before this project?

Read more: Interviews - Heidi Mumford-Yeo

Rehearsals 2019 - Part I

March 13th - 15th 2019

Our first rehearsals since the hiatus from last year. It was lovely having back so much of the "Misanthropos" family. Maximianno spoke very beautifully about what he went through and the joy that nearly the whole cast had returned. 
It was quite emotional, and such a testament both to the production and our rehearsals last year that nearly everyone made sure they were available to come back.

Read more: Rehearsals 2019 - Part I

Rehearsals 2018

September 13th - 15th

Our second segment of rehearsals for "Misanthropos".  When we met initially, back in March a large chunk of that rehearsal was about finding the voice.  Finding the beat and rhyme of the text, and unifying how we deliver Shakespeare as a whole.  For example I don't do Shakespeare the tradition way; I don't necessarily follow the pauses or punctuation of the text (sometimes I ignore the rhyme all together, if I'm being honest).  And while that can work on stage, in a film, the way we speak is amplified tenfold... it would put my delivery in uncomfortably harsh relief.  And I wasn't the only one who's (shall we say) 'unique' way of doing Shakespeare jarred with the whole. 
So Maximianno had to bring us all together, one voice, one rhyme, and that involved taking the script and reading, re-reading and reading again.  And just when we thought we had read it enough, we re-read it some more.  It sounds laborious, but by the end we were unified (both in style and understanding) with Shakespeare.

Read more: Rehearsals 2018

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